Ockeghem Academy

February 24 - March 10, 2021

 

Guillaume de Machaut: Le grant retthorique

April 17, 2021

 

OUT NOW: A 14th-Century Salmagundi

Digital Release

 

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OCKEGHEM SONGS VOLUME I

“. . .these neglected chansons take on a hitherto unsuspected radiance that touches heart and mind alike.” Bestenliste, Preis der deutschen Schallplattenkritik (January 2020)

 

Cipriano de Rore, Madrigals for five voices (1542): WORLD PREMIERE RECORDING

“. . .masterfully, sensitively done, and most highly recommended.” – Early Music America (June 2020)

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Preview: Ockeghem Academy

February 24, March 3, March 10, 2021

More Information & Tickets

A 3-part lecture series (90 minutes each, including Q&A) presented by Blue Heron’s Artistic Director Scott Metcalfe and Professor Sean Gallagher of the New England Conservatory, adviser to our Ockeghem@600 project.

Blue Heron on the Radio

The Lost Music of Canterbury
WCRB “In Concert” Broadcast

Stream On Demand Here

Concert Information and Program

Recorded on February 8, 2019 at The Parish of All Saints – Ashmont

This program will be available for on-demand streaming for 6 months past the live date.

Upcoming Concerts

Le grant retthorique: Guillaume de Machaut
April 17, 2021

New this Season!

Ockeghem Academy
A 3-part lecture series (90 minutes each) presented by Blue Heron’s Artistic Director Scott Metcalfe and Professor Sean Gallagher of the New England Conservatory, adviser to our Ockeghem@600 project.

February 24, 2021  7:00 PM
March 3, 2021  7:00 PM
March 10, 2021  7:00 PM

Spotlight Sessions
Exquisite solo performances, interviews featuring a diversity of interests and expertise, and single classes programmed exclusively for Blue Heron, each 45-60 minutes.

Jessie Ann Owens & Alessandro Quarta: Cipriano de Rore’s Madrigali of 1542
March 31, 2021  7:00 PM





» More recordings

This highly important [Peterhouse recording] project, one of the most important early choral projects of our time, has unearthed a series of masterly composers hitherto virtually unknown...Such is the authority of Scott Metcalfe and his singers with this repertoire that they negotiate even the most daringly challenging and unexpected passages with utter confidence, and, as previously, with a delicious blend of expressiveness and seemingly inexorable forward momentum.

D. James Ross, Early Music Review (UK)

a revelation - fresh, dynamic and vibrant...urgent and wondrous music-making of the highest order

Damian Fowler, Gramophone (UK)

fine gradations of dynamics; pungent diction; telling contrasts of ethereal and earthly timbres; tempos that are more lusty than languid; a way of propelling a phrase toward a goal. ... The singing is both precise and fluid, immaculate and alive...

Alex Ross, The New Yorker

A listener then would have been lucky to hear these works brought off with such panache. The program is by turns pensive and lively, and the scholarship required to evoke stylistic accuracy is put totally at the service of performance.

David Allen, The New York Times

I feel privileged to be able to revel in such a subtle shaped set of performances... This is the kind of recording that makes you sit up and pay attention.. There is plenty that is memorable here, and always the anticipation of something juicy to relish just around the corner. You can't ask much more than that from a CD.

Dominy Clements, MusicWeb International

The earthy sensuousness of Blue Heron's singing coupled with the curatorial care behind its programming have clearly earned the trust of audiences

Jeremy Eichler, The Boston Globe

But Blue Heron’s devotion to this repertory — the ensemble has recorded five albums of music from the Peterhouse Partbooks — is not justified only by its rarity. This is vivid and radiant music. ...
... With two or three singers to a part and women stepping into the shoes of boy choristers, Blue Heron brings a zesty and sensual sound to these works of devotional music.

Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim, The New York Times